Holy Scraps

"Admiration for a quality or an art can be so strong that it deters us from striving to possess it."
-Nietzsche

thebeatswitness:

Konstantin Kalynovych, Eclipse, 2009

thebeatswitness:

Konstantin Kalynovych, Eclipse, 2009

art-of-illlustration:

Ethan Murrow, All Mine (detail), 2012

art-of-illlustration:

Ethan Murrow, All Mine (detail), 2012

(via o-g-steve)

artbyjeffreymeyer:

Jeffrey Meyer, Up from Sleep (2011), paper collage, 8 x 9 inches | website.

artbyjeffreymeyer:

Jeffrey Meyer, Up from Sleep (2011), paper collage, 8 x 9 inches | website.

(via truth-is-beauty-and-beauty-truth)

artbyjeffreymeyer:

Jeffrey Meyer, Tomorrow (2012), paper collage, 7 x 9 inches | website.

artbyjeffreymeyer:

Jeffrey Meyer, Tomorrow (2012), paper collage, 7 x 9 inches | website.

bbook:

After spending his early twenties writing film criticism and aspiring to make films of own, Schrader was hovering around Hollywood, unsettled by the films presented to him. What he saw were pictures that “exalted idiosyncrasy and the cult of personality,” focusing on me and not we, highlighting the importance of individuality as a means of understanding oneself on a greater level. However, through his time spent admiring Eames and learning from his work, Schrader came to find a person who exposed him that to the idea that the cult of personality was in fact ephemeral, flowing from one person to the next, uniting humanity with a deeper kind of likeness.
Schrader claims it was that sentiment, combined with the thought that “images are ideas,” which overturned his world. The article he wrote on Eames would be published in Film Quarterly in the Spring of 1970, and was titled “Poetry of Ideas.” The focus was on Eames’ short films created with his wife, Ray, and how they exemplified something entirely unique to the cinematic tradition. Amalgamating science and technology to convey their own means of communication, Schrader said the films possessed a “unified aesthetic with many branch-like manifestations,” and that they had a “cerebral sensibility” seldom seen in the medium.
A Brief Look Back on Paul Schrader and the Man Who Overturned His World, Charles Eames

bbook:

After spending his early twenties writing film criticism and aspiring to make films of own, Schrader was hovering around Hollywood, unsettled by the films presented to him. What he saw were pictures that “exalted idiosyncrasy and the cult of personality,” focusing on me and not we, highlighting the importance of individuality as a means of understanding oneself on a greater level. However, through his time spent admiring Eames and learning from his work, Schrader came to find a person who exposed him that to the idea that the cult of personality was in fact ephemeral, flowing from one person to the next, uniting humanity with a deeper kind of likeness.

Schrader claims it was that sentiment, combined with the thought that “images are ideas,” which overturned his world. The article he wrote on Eames would be published in Film Quarterly in the Spring of 1970, and was titled “Poetry of Ideas.” The focus was on Eames’ short films created with his wife, Ray, and how they exemplified something entirely unique to the cinematic tradition. Amalgamating science and technology to convey their own means of communication, Schrader said the films possessed a “unified aesthetic with many branch-like manifestations,” and that they had a “cerebral sensibility” seldom seen in the medium.

A Brief Look Back on Paul Schrader and the Man Who Overturned His World, Charles Eames

archives-dada:

Theo Van Doesburg, Poster for Dada Matinée, january 1923, printed matter, 62 × 85 cm (24.4 × 33.5 in)

archives-dada:

Theo Van Doesburg, Poster for Dada Matinée, january 1923, printed matter, 62 × 85 cm (24.4 × 33.5 in)

(Source: commons.wikimedia.org, via pappawheelie)

inneroptics:

Ioannis Mandafounis & Fabrice Mazliah by Dominik Mentzos
possibility—girl:

Transgender/Transvestite person arrested under paragraph 175 in Nazi Germany, c.1933-1945

possibility—girl:

Transgender/Transvestite person arrested under paragraph 175 in Nazi Germany, c.1933-1945

commiepinkofag:

Stanislaus Sokolowski, b 04.20.1923

Auschwitz concentration camp prisoner number: 35277

(Source: jewishmemory.info)

commiepinkofag:

“Night exists for more than sleep, which is why, my love, we stay awake so often.”
— Manfred Lewin
Excerpt translated from a small notebook Manfred Lewin gave his boyfriend, Gad Beck, containing memories and drawings Lewin had made. Lewin, with his family, died at Auschwitz. Beck kept the notebook for over 50 years before donating it to the Holocaust Memorial Museum. 

commiepinkofag:

“Night exists for more than sleep, which is why, my love, we stay awake so often.”

— Manfred Lewin

Excerpt translated from a small notebook Manfred Lewin gave his boyfriend, Gad Beck, containing memories and drawings Lewin had made. Lewin, with his family, died at Auschwitz. Beck kept the notebook for over 50 years before donating it to the Holocaust Memorial Museum. 

(Source: ushmm.org)

the-holocaust:

"Do You Remember, When" - An Online Exhibition

What was it like to live as a young Jew in Berlin during the Nazi deportations? This exhibition details the life of Manfred Lewin, a young Jew who was active in one of Berlin’s Zionist youth groups until his deportation to and murder in Auschwitz-Birkenau. Manfred recorded these turbulent times in a small, hand-made book that he gave to his Jewish friend and gay companion, Gad Beck. Mr. Beck, a Holocaust survivor who again lives in Berlin, donated the booklet to the Museum in December 1999. The exhibition centers around the 17-page artifact, which illustrates the daily life of the two friends, their youth group, and the culture in which they lived.

(via ushmm)

the-holocaust:

Manfred Lewin

Manfred Lewin was born on September 8, 1922 in Berlin where he lived with his parents and four siblings in a predominantly Jewish section of the city. During the Third Reich, the family lived in poverty in a small apartment not far from the home of Gad Beck at Dragoner Strasse 43. Manfred’s father was a barber and his mother, Jenny, a former secretary. Manfred joined the Hehalutz Zionist youth movement in Berlin, and together with Gad Beck, who became his homosexual lover, took part in activities at the Youth Aliyah school run by Jizchak Schwersenz. Manfred was deported to Auschwitz in November 1942 where he perished.
(via ushmm)

the-holocaust:

Manfred Lewin

Manfred Lewin was born on September 8, 1922 in Berlin where he lived with his parents and four siblings in a predominantly Jewish section of the city. During the Third Reich, the family lived in poverty in a small apartment not far from the home of Gad Beck at Dragoner Strasse 43. Manfred’s father was a barber and his mother, Jenny, a former secretary. Manfred joined the Hehalutz Zionist youth movement in Berlin, and together with Gad Beck, who became his homosexual lover, took part in activities at the Youth Aliyah school run by Jizchak Schwersenz. Manfred was deported to Auschwitz in November 1942 where he perished.

(via ushmm)

agostinoarrivabene:

my portrait.  “arpocratico”  . 2013
credits foto by Giancarlo Pagliara . Milano
www.agostinoarrivabene.it

agostinoarrivabene:

my portrait.  “arpocratico”  . 2013

credits foto by Giancarlo Pagliara . Milano

www.agostinoarrivabene.it

agostinoarrivabene:

Agostino Arrivabene, Selfportrait Pantocrator, 2011 
oil on ancient wood

agostinoarrivabene:

Agostino Arrivabene, Selfportrait Pantocrator, 2011 

oil on ancient wood

(Source: agostinoarrivabene.com)

agostinoarrivabene:

Agostino Arrivabene, selfportrait with bacterial cloud . 2010 , oil on canvas , cm 50 x 40

agostinoarrivabene:

Agostino Arrivabene, selfportrait with bacterial cloud . 2010 , oil on canvas , cm 50 x 40